A whole lot of cooking

Will and I just went on a little weekend getaway less than two hours north of Louisville. One day, after talking to our friends about their upcoming vacations, we opened up Airbnb and chose Columbus, Indiana, which is famous for several of its public building being designed by noted architects. (I’ll share more of the architecture pictures soon.) It is also right next to a quaint little artsy town and a state park. We ended up finding a Airbnb that was located on a dirt road off of dirt road. The woman who owned it was a minister to the Earth Mother, which I a very unfamiliar with but it was definitely reflected in her decorating.

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I was less excited about the trip, though, when I realized that we would be on the Whole30 during it. The Whole30 = lots of cooking, packing, and not being able to eat out, so we packed a cooler full of leftovers, gathered some vegetables, eggs, and meat to cook, and made a little meal plan for the weekend which included some delicious and surprisingly filling soup.

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I made bone broth using TheKitchn’s bone broth instructions and then used that to make Paleo Asian Chicken Soup. The bone broth sounds complicated, but it wasn’t. I bought chicken necks at Whole Foods, roasted them in the oven, cut up some celery and onion I had in the fridge, and threw it into the slow cooker I borrowed. Twenty-four hours later I had rich, flavorful broth.

The final product of the soup was really special, warm, and filling. I could talk about the recipes we have cooked and the Whole30 for forever, but my brain is tired of food. It just wants to have brownies and cookies and cake and for me to hush about the other stuff.

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Anyway, I ended up really appreciating the trip because it gave me a chance to relax, not think about food, and to have fun with Will. We talked about his mountain biking days, what life would be like in the middle of nowhere, and the book I was reading, Miss Jane  by Brad Watson. We spent time with God in a touristy, cozy tea shop with a fireplace. We dreamed a little about the future. We missed Louisville and our apartment by the end of it. We felt more relaxed and expectant about the holidays.

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Here’s to weekend getaways and quitting the Whole30 (more on that later)!

 

 

 

 

 

 

what’s cooking-roasted root veggies

Last week, my friend who has graciously let me use her camera, asked Will and me to take some pictures for their Christmas cards. You can tell how on top of it my friend is, right? I still think of Christmas cards as being an adult thing.

Anyway, we went back to her house afterward to walk and sit by the fire pit. My friend has a little hutch in her kitchen with gorgeous cook books on the shelves, including a delicious veggie-centric one called Plenty by Ottolenghi. She laughed and joked that the recipes had ingredients that were too hard to find, so when she let me borrow it, I scoured through the ingredients list looking for one that seemed more familiar, and this roasted root vegetable recipe is the first (and only) one I made.

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We’ve been using our cast iron skillet a lot lately. It was a hand-me-down from Will’s grandfather who passed away last year. I never got to meet his grandmother, but Will says she really loved cooking and remembers sleepovers in Huntsville with a big breakfast in the morning. I like to think of her sweet face from the scrapbooks smiling and cooking sausage in the same skillet.

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This is basically roasted root vegetables (including parsnips which I had never cooked with) with a tangy, capery dressing. We paired it with chicken thighs, but I think it would be even better with a pork tenderloin. Just rub a little oil on that baby, brown it for 12 minutes on 550 (flipping in the middle), and then broil it at 450 for 20-30 more minutes. I did it until it was 140 degrees in the middle. Anyway! Back to the veggies.

I used this recipe, and we munched on it for a few days afterward. We made this before the Whole30, but you could easily replace the mustard with a Whole30 compliant mustard (try Annie’s) and omit the sesame seeds. Yum!

img_0104img_0106What have you been cooking up lately?